A Cheesy Snack/Side Dish


Cheesy Brussel Sprouts, an easy snack/side dish

1 bag of frozen Brussel sprouts (plain)

4 slices (or 4 oz) of real cheddar cheese

Lightly steam the brussel sprouts with a little water, until thawed out and semi cooked. Let cool if cutting by hand. Slice/chop the brussel sprouts by hand or with a food processor, returning to the pan with 2 tablespoons of butter, lightly saute until fully cooked and tender.

Mix in the cheese, putting the pan on low heat until the cheese is melted. Serves 4-6 people a side dish/snack

St. Barbara Capella Ruins, Langensteinbach, Badische History


The St. Barbara Capella (church) was built in the beginning of the 1300s in the town edge
of Langensteinbach here in the Alb Valley.
A little history (compliments of the a German information website) tells the story beautifully here:

“The first documentary mention of the Barbara Chapel as “capella sanctae Barbarae” dates from 1432. The building itself dates back to the 14th century. Before the annexation of the chapel and the associated source to the Holy Barbara, a Celtic sanctuary was found there. Surely the dedication of the chapel is connected with it. Next to the church there was a graveyard for some time – wall remains can be seen on the square and foundations under the ground. Various legends surround the chapel and spring. For almost one and a half centuries, the chapel was a popular place of pilgrimage and the square before it was used for markets. A change took place in the second half of the 16th century with the rejection of the pilgrimage through the now reformed Wuerttemberg Duke. However, it would still be many years before the pilgrimage of the pilgrimage took place. In 1590, the church was still described as “a magnificent temple consecrated with artistic paintings on the Barbaraberg, sacred Barbara”. Twice a year in the presence of a large national market held before this temple. In the Langensteinbach camp book of 1605, however, the first records of the death of the church are described. The subsequent times of the Thirty Years’ War also made travel on land too dangerous, so that the pilgrimage finally fell into oblivion. The assignment of the church to the restituted monastery of Herrenalb did not change, as this was now impoverished. Only the market was continued on the Barbaraberg. In 1818 St. Barbara had completely ruined itself and remained exposed to the decay and plundering of the entire 19th century. In 1902 one remembered the ruin and began a restoration. Above all, the tower was to be used again as a lookout tower. During a new renovation, a massive spiral staircase was installed in the tower in 1966. The tower is open daily as a view tower and is located in the Waldpark St. Barbara in Karlsbad-Langensteinbach.”

 

Karlsruhe Zoologisch Garten


An exciting Saturday afternoon together at the Zoo together, where even the Hippotamus eat Germain cuisine of potatoes and cabbage.

The zoo is much larger than what first meets the eye and it is beautifully laid out, including animals and venues from all continents of the world.

The Seels (also know as Sea Dogs in German) and the Hippopotamus (Known as the
“River Horse” when translated from German) were very active while the Elephants trumpeted at dinner time. A splash of a good time as the seels breached and barked in the water.

Mushroom Curried Tuna on Rice


Ingredients

1 can Tuna in oil

1 cup dry white rice

1 small head of broccoli

1 can sliced mushrooms, drained

2 cups water

1 jar of Uncle Bens creamy curry sauce

In a medium skillet, add tuna (w. Oil), mushrooms, and chopped broccoli stems, saute on low heat for 5 minutes, add jar of curry sauce, simmer on low for 10 minutes.

In a pot (or rice cooker), cook rice w. 2 cups of water.

Steam fresh broccoli florets with a pinch of salt.

Serve curry mix over rice and broccoli as a side. Serves 2 to 4

 

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People Watching on Kirche Platz


Wonderful fashion and treasures on my eBay

 What an exciting and interesting afternoon-evening of people watching. So much variety and interactions galore–skipping children, a bicycle with a legit trailer, a skinned knee, an elderly man whistling down the cobble stones, a couple on a date (and enjoy Apfel Streudel) and so much more!! While enjoying the visual stimulation, my taste buds were delighted by Blood Orange infused teas and a snack on the very busy platz. What a beautiful day!!! 

The Roosters Well and more, Speilberg, Germany


50 reichs bank note from 1908 $9.99 OBO eBay

Simple Salads


Salami Salad

Tuna on Greens

Sometimes cooking and firing up the stove-oven isn’t an appealing option, tired or not.  Salads are simple, easy and convenient to make (and often inexpensive.)

 

The Salami salad:

1/2 Head Iceberg lettuce

Small jar of green olives (pit free)

2 slices of your favorite real cheese

green salad onions

2 slices of salami

Chopped everything up, mix together, and serve. Top with your favorite dressing.

Tuna on Greens Salad:

1 large bag of mixed greens

1 Roma tomato

1 can of tuna

1 small jar of green olives

Chop up the tomato, mix everything together, serve. Add favorite salad dressing. Garnish with carrot sticks.

 

 

 

RosenMontags, Deutschland


Woohoo!!! Attending Rosenmontags Festival today is beyond description, the hooping, hollering and joy was infectious, and everyone was in attendance, including this American ( I even dressed up as little red riding hood, sans wolf.)

Here is a bit of history (which I had to look up to get a better understanding.) Compliments of Wikepedia

In parts of East and South Germany, as well as in Austria, the carnival is called Fasching. In Franconia and Baden-Württemberg as well as some other parts of Germany, the carnival is called Fas(t)nacht, Fassenacht or Fasnet; in Switzerland, Fasnacht.

While Germany’s carnival traditions are mostly celebrated in the predominantly Roman Catholic southern and western parts of the country, the Protestant North traditionally knows a festival under the Low Saxon names Fastelavend [ˈfastl̩.ˌɒːvm̩t], Fastelabend [ˈfastl̩.ˌɒːbm̩t] and Fastlaam (also spelled Fastlom) [ˈfastl̩ɒːm]. This name has been imported to Denmark as Fastelavn and is related to Vastenoavond in the Low-Saxon-speaking parts of the Netherlands. It is traditionally connected with farm servants or generally young men going from house to house in the villages and collecting sausages, eggs and bacon, which was consumed in a festivity on the same evening. While going from house to house they wore masks and made noise. The old tradition vanished in many places, in other places under influence of German carnival traditions it came to resemble carnival with its parades.

Beginning and peak of the festival season

The carnival session, also known as the “Fifth Season”, begins each year on 11 November at 11:11 a.m. and finishes on Ash Wednesday of the following year with the main festivities happening around Rosenmontag (Rose Monday).

Although the festivities and parties start as early as the beginning of January, the actual carnival week starts on the Fat Thursday (Weiberfastnacht) before Ash Wednesday (in Germany). The big German carnival parades are held on the weekend before and especially on Rosenmontag, the day before Shrove Tuesday, and sometimes also on Shrove Tuesday (Faschingsdienstag or Veilchendienstag) itself in the suburbs of larger carnival cities.

Innenstadt, Ettlingen


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