St. Barbara Capella Ruins, Langensteinbach, Badische History


The St. Barbara Capella (church) was built in the beginning of the 1300s in the town edge
of Langensteinbach here in the Alb Valley.
A little history (compliments of the a German information website) tells the story beautifully here:

“The first documentary mention of the Barbara Chapel as “capella sanctae Barbarae” dates from 1432. The building itself dates back to the 14th century. Before the annexation of the chapel and the associated source to the Holy Barbara, a Celtic sanctuary was found there. Surely the dedication of the chapel is connected with it. Next to the church there was a graveyard for some time – wall remains can be seen on the square and foundations under the ground. Various legends surround the chapel and spring. For almost one and a half centuries, the chapel was a popular place of pilgrimage and the square before it was used for markets. A change took place in the second half of the 16th century with the rejection of the pilgrimage through the now reformed Wuerttemberg Duke. However, it would still be many years before the pilgrimage of the pilgrimage took place. In 1590, the church was still described as “a magnificent temple consecrated with artistic paintings on the Barbaraberg, sacred Barbara”. Twice a year in the presence of a large national market held before this temple. In the Langensteinbach camp book of 1605, however, the first records of the death of the church are described. The subsequent times of the Thirty Years’ War also made travel on land too dangerous, so that the pilgrimage finally fell into oblivion. The assignment of the church to the restituted monastery of Herrenalb did not change, as this was now impoverished. Only the market was continued on the Barbaraberg. In 1818 St. Barbara had completely ruined itself and remained exposed to the decay and plundering of the entire 19th century. In 1902 one remembered the ruin and began a restoration. Above all, the tower was to be used again as a lookout tower. During a new renovation, a massive spiral staircase was installed in the tower in 1966. The tower is open daily as a view tower and is located in the Waldpark St. Barbara in Karlsbad-Langensteinbach.”

 

An Evening of Chiming Bells


A long day of walking and siteseeing wound down with a lovely evening of church bells chiming to ring in the beauty of the day, which, of course, included a dark-strong coffee in a Italian cafe on the river’s edge. The river and the bells provided a lovely musical venue, with a menagerie of lyrical beauty.

There is a beautiful, old fashioned wooden bridge that crosses the river Murg, providing an exquisite view of the Murg Valley and Murg River, bubbling over stones and dancing its way through the village.  The cool, balmy air filled the senses with the delights of the earth, wood burning stoves and roasting sauages in the market square.

A delightful evening of pure enjoyment for all the senses–a quiet village well worth seeing–and a wonderful place to stay even longer.

 

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Black Forrest National Forrest and a Village


 

15 kilometers in one day makes a very happy woman, and very tired feet!!!

The adventure began with a tram ride to the North, and disembarking in Raumümzach–which only has one stop for the village (which also boasts a lovely place called ‘Hotel Waterfall’).

I packed my lunch, grabbed my rucksack and off I went exploring, the visual experience was stunning this autumn season but nothing compared to the scent filled fresh air that prevailed itself upon my senses.

I ate my brown bag lunch, overlooking the Murg River near Erbersbronn and a house in the country had chickens as i heard the rooster crow in midday.

Walking leisurely through the hills and valleys (both minor) of the area provided an over abundant wealth of beauty and excitement and a day filled with much peach, quiet and joy.

Directions Post, Erbersbronn, Germany

Directions Post, Erbersbronn, Germany

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Black Forrest National Park

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The Murg River, near Erbersbronn, Germany

The Black Forrest National Park

The Black Forrest National Park

The Water Fall Hotel, Raumünzach

The Water Fall Hotel, Raumünzach

Raumünzach, a village in the Black Forrest

Raumünzach, a village in the Black Forrest

Motodrom


What an absolutely wonderful way to experience a small village then by drinking the local fair. The barkeep here at Motodrom is super friendly and very helpful. She obliging gave me some of the local history here in Kirschbaumwasen, Baden Wurtamburg, Germany.

Well worth seeing and spending the day here, great natural scenary with wonderful people, easily accessible by tram.

Schloss Bruchsal, Bruschal, Germany


The German word ‘Schloss’ has many meanings in English, it can mean ‘castle’ ‘Manor’ ‘Estate’ and so many more things!!! This particular ‘Schloss’ was residence of some nobility and a politcal statement of the noblemans success. The upper floor also hosts an amazing array of musical playing devices from the late 19th century and early 20th century. Well worth a visit and the self guided tour (audio head set is an option) is well worth it.

Thomas and I so enjoyed our day. Our schloss card is really paying off–what a way to adventure on a dime–mutiple venues for one flat price

Treasure hunting is so much fun–and it is helping to create great and awesome products on my eBay.

The Legend of…St. George, the dragon slayer


St. George, a top a fountain, slaying the dragon.

St. George, a top a fountain, slaying the dragon. Ettlingen, Germany

St. George, doing his slaying, Karlsruhe, Germany

St. George, doing his slaying, Karlsruhe, Germany

According to the Golden Legend, the narrative episode of Saint George and the Dragon took place somewhere he called “Silene”, in Libya; the Golden Legend is the first to place this story in Libya as a sufficiently exotic locale, where a dragon might be found. In the tenth-century Georgian narrative, the place is the fictional city of Lasia, and the idolatrous emperor who rules the city is called Selinus.[7]

The town had a small lake with a plague-bearing dragon living in it and poisoning the countryside. To appease the dragon, the people of Silene fed it two sheep every day. When they ran out of sheep they started feeding it their children, chosen by lottery. One time the lot fell on the king’s daughter.[8] The king, in his grief, told the people they could have all his gold and silver and half of his kingdom if his daughter were spared; the people refused. The daughter was sent out to the lake, dressed as a bride, to be fed to the dragon.[7]

Saint George by chance rode past the lake. The princess tried to send him away, but he vowed to remain. The dragon emerged from the lake while they were conversing. Saint George made the Sign of the Cross and charged it on horseback, seriously wounding it with his lance. He then called to the princess to throw him her girdle, and he put it around the dragon’s neck. When she did so, the dragon followed the girl like a meek beast on a leash. The princess and Saint George led the dragon back to the city of Silene, where it terrified the populace. Saint George offered to kill the dragon if they consented to become Christians and be baptised. Fifteen thousand men including the king of Silene converted to Christianity. George then killed the dragon, and the body was carted out of the city on four ox-carts. The king built a church to the Blessed Virgin Mary and Saint George on the site where the dragon died and a spring flowed from its altar with water that cured all disease

(text is from Wikipedia)

A day in Ruins, Waldkirch, Germany


Waldkirch, Germany

Marktplatz, the town center square where a lot of hubbub occurs, a great place to drink coffee and people watch

Waldkirch, Germany

The country road view of Waldkirch, a quaint small town

Waldkirch Church

A lovely church with lyrical bells chiming

Fortress--noble ruins Waldkirch, Germany

Fortress Ruins on the hillside above Waldkirch. Closed today but still beautiful. Just everyday life in Germany.

 

A day ‘ruined’ when taking an alternate route back to my abode. Absolutely Stunning!!!  I never found this place on a map for tourists or anything but with some digging, some history was learned and stumbling upon some ruins is a treasure—life off the beaten path sure has some old perks.

The people in this small town are also very friendly, it seems the further away from big cities, the better the atmosphere.

Treasure hunting is so much fun–and it is helping to create great and awesome products on my eBay.

Creativity and Coffee


Anna Potthoff ---trying Turkish Coffee for the first time, Strasbourg, France

Anna Potthoff —trying Turkish Coffee for the first time, Strasbourg, France

I admit it, I am a coffee and postcard addict. I crave to sample and savor beans and caffeine wherever my feet go, taking a moment to send a postcard to a friend or family member.

  I also collect ‘smashed’ pennies, kind where you insert a coin and a payment, turn the crank, and out comes a small souvenir. They provide great souvenirs and I hope to collect enough to create a charm bracelet-

I am, in short,  an adventurer with with a yearning to expereince all. Alas, adventures are not free, so I am getting creative.

I go to local Flea Markets–held rather frequently and find goodies–putting them on eBay to fund my adventures.  A portion of every sale also benefits a charity–the treasures are forever changing, so please, check back frequently.

Happy shopping!!

my eBay

Writing a postcard and realizing I am out of coffee

Writing a postcard and realizing I am out of coffee

Penny Souvenir Crank, Strasbourg, France

Penny Souvenir Crank, Strasbourg, France

I purchase postcards to help me discover venues in new areas and to send notes to loved ones--one postcard always goes into my journal as a keepsake souvenir

Postcards Addict

Over the River–and into Lauterbourg, France


 
A new friend’s invitation drove me to the edge, over the river, and thru the woods to a local French Restaurant—Au Bord Du Rhin

Changing countries in this part of Europe is easy, by American standards. Planes, trains, automobiles, trams and so much more make it convienent and super accesible to cross borders.

The menu was divided into three langues–French (of course), German (which I am in the prelimary classes of learning) and a very unique version of English.  When the ingredients or key words of a dish are still foreign, guessing (or asking) is best when ordering and finding yourself lucky and on the receiving end is always a pleasant surprise.

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French Desserts–Caramel Flan with a vanilla sauce and fresh fruit–including St. Johns Berries

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The Restaurant’s Logo placed artistically on a plate

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French Mouse (chocolate) with cream sauce adn fresh seasonal fruit

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Monika, a local German friend, showing me the ropes of French Cuisine–from lochs to Chevre and so much more

 

Treasure hunting is so much fun–and it is helping to create great and awesome products on my eBay.